Emergency Care Available!

Canton, Michigan: (734) 844-1300
South Lyon, Michigan: (248) 437-1010

Emergency Care Available!


Canton, Michigan: (734) 844-1300


South Lyon, Michigan: (248) 437-1010

Everything You Need to Know About Your Dental Oral Health

Everything You Need to Know About Your Dental Oral Health

Dental and oral health is an essential part of your overall health and well-being. Poor oral hygiene can lead to dental cavities and gum disease and has also been linked to heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Maintaining healthy teeth and gums is a lifelong commitment. The earlier you learn proper oral hygiene habits — such as brushing, flossing, and limiting your sugar intake — the easier it’ll be to avoid costly dental procedures and long-term health issues.

Facts about dental and oral health
Dental cavities and gum disease are very common.

  • between 60 and 90 percent of school children have at least one dental cavity
  • nearly 100 percent of adults have at least one dental cavity
  • between 15 and 20 percent of adults ages 35 to 44 have severe gum disease
  • about 30 percent of people around the world ages 65 to 74 don’t have any natural teeth left
  • in most countries, out of every 100,000 people, there are between 1 and 10 cases of oral cancer
  • the burden of oral disease is much higher in poor or disadvantaged population groups

There are many steps you can take to keep your teeth healthy. For example, dental and oral disease can be greatly reduced by:

  • brushing your teeth with fluoride toothpaste at least twice a day
  • flossing your teeth at least once a day
  • decreasing your intake of sugar
  • eating a diet high in fruits and vegetables
  • avoiding tobacco products
  • drinking fluoridated water
  • seeking professional dental care

Symptoms of dental and oral problems

You shouldn’t wait until you have symptoms to visit your dentist. Going to the dentist twice a year will usually allow them to catch a problem before you even notice any symptoms.

If you experience any of the following warning signs of dental health issues, you should make an appointment to see your dentist as soon as possible:

  • ulcers, sores, or tender areas in the mouth that won’t heal after a week or two
  • bleeding or swollen gums after brushing or flossing
  • chronic bad breath
  • sudden sensitivity to hot and cold temperatures or beverages
  • pain or toothache
  • loose teeth
  • receding gums
  • pain with chewing or biting
  • swelling of the face and cheek
  • clicking of the jaw
  • cracked or broken teeth
  • frequent dry mouth

If any of these symptoms are accompanied by a high fever and facial or neck swelling, you should seek emergency medical treatment. Learn more about the warning signs of oral health issues.

Causes of dental and oral diseases

Your oral cavity collects all sorts of bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Some of them belong there, making up the normal flora of your mouth. They’re generally harmless in small quantities. But a diet high in sugar creates conditions in which acid-producing bacteria can flourish. This acid dissolves tooth enamel and causes dental cavities.

Bacteria near your gumline thrive in a sticky matrix called plaque. Plaque accumulates, hardens, and migrates down the length of your tooth if it isn’t removed regularly by brushing and flossing. This can inflame your gums and cause the condition known as gingivitis.

Increased inflammation causes your gums to begin to pull away from your teeth. This process creates pockets in which pus may eventually collect. This more advanced stage of gum disease is called periodontitis.

There are many factors that contribute to gingivitis and periodontitis, including:

  • smoking
  • poor brushing habits
  • frequent snacking on sugary foods and drinks
  • diabetes
  • the use of medications that reduce the amount of saliva in the mouth
  • family history, or genetics
  • certain infections, such as HIV or AIDS
  • hormonal changes in women
  • acid reflux, or heartburn
  • frequent vomiting, due to the acid

 

Diagnosing dental and oral diseases

Most dental and oral problems can be diagnosed during a dental exam. During an exam, your dentist will closely inspect your:

teeth, mouth, throat, tongue, cheeks, jaw, and neck

Your dentist might tap or scrape at your teeth with various tools or instruments to assist with a diagnosis. A technician at the dentist’s office will take dental X-rays of your mouth, making sure to get an image of each of your teeth. Be sure to tell your dentist if you’re pregnant. Women who are pregnant shouldn’t have X-rays.

A tool called a probe can be used to measure your gum pockets. This small ruler can tell your dentist whether or not you have gum disease or receding gums. In a healthy mouth, the depth of the pockets between the teeth are usually between 1 and 3 millimeters (mm). Any measurement higher than that may mean you have gum disease.

If your dentist finds any abnormal lumps, lesions, or growths in your mouth, they may perform a gum biopsy. During a biopsy, a small piece of tissue is removed from the growth or lesion. The sample is then sent to a laboratory for examination under a microscope to check for cancerous cells.

If oral cancer is suspected, your dentist may also order imaging tests to see if the cancer has spread. Tests may include:

X-ray, MRI scan, CT scan and endoscopy

 

Types of dental and oral diseases
We use our teeth and mouths for a lot of things so it’s not surprising how many things can go wrong over time, especially if you don’t take proper care of your teeth. Most dental and oral problems can be prevented with proper oral hygiene. You’ll likely experience at least one dental problem during your lifetime.

Cavities
Cavities are also called caries or tooth decay. These are areas of the tooth that have been permanently damaged and may even have holes in them. Cavities are fairly common. They occur when bacteria, food, and acid coat your teeth and form a plaque. The acid on your teeth starts to eat away at the enamel and then the underlying dentin, or connective tissue. Over time, this can lead to permanent damage.

Gum disease (gingivitis)
Gum disease, also called gingivitis, is inflammation of the gums. It’s usually the result of plaque building up on your teeth due to poor brushing and flossing habits. Gingivitis can make your gums swell and bleed when you brush or floss. Untreated gingivitis can lead to periodontitis, a more serious infection.

Periodontitis
As periodontitis progresses, the infection can spread to your jaw and bones. It can also cause an inflammatory response throughout the body.

Cracked or broken teeth
A tooth can crack or break from an injury to the mouth, chewing hard foods, or grinding the teeth at night. A cracked tooth can be very painful. You should visit your dentist right away if you’ve cracked or broken a tooth.

Sensitive teeth
If your teeth are sensitive, you might feel pain or discomfort after having cold or hot foods or beverages.

Tooth sensitivity is also referred to as “dentin hypersensitivity.” It sometimes occurs temporarily after having a root canal or a filling. It can also be the result of:

  • gum disease
  • receding gums
  • a cracked tooth
  • worn-down fillings or crowns

Some people naturally have sensitive teeth because they have thinner enamel.

Most of the time, naturally sensitive teeth can be treated with a change in your daily oral hygiene regimen. There are specific brands of toothpaste and mouthwash for people with sensitive teeth.

Shop for toothpaste and mouthwash made for people with sensitive teeth.

Oral cancer

Oral cancers include cancer of the:

gums, tongue, lips, cheek, floor of the mouth, and hard and soft palate

A dentist is usually the first person to recognize oral cancer. Tobacco use, such as smoking and chewing tobacco, is the biggest risk factor for oral cancer.

According to the Oral Cancer Foundation (OCF), nearly 50,000 Americans will be diagnosed with oral cancer this year. In general, the earlier that oral cancer is diagnosed, the better the outlook.

 

The link between oral and general health
Oral health has risen in importance in recent years, as researchers have discovered a connection between declining oral health and underlying systemic conditions. It turns out that a healthy mouth can help you maintain a healthy body. According to the Mayo Clinic, oral bacteria and inflammation may be associated with:

  • heart disease
  • endocarditis, or inflammation of the lining of the heart
  • premature birth
  • low birth weight

Bacteria can spread from your oral cavity to your bloodstream, causing infective endocarditis. Infective endocarditis is a life-threatening infection of your heart valves. Your dentist may suggest you take antibiotics as a preventive measure before they perform any dental procedure that could dislodge bacteria in your mouth.

 

Family Dentist in South Lyon, Michigan

 

Treating dental and oral problems
Even if you’ve been taking good care of your teeth, you’ll still need to have a professional cleaning twice a year during a routine visit with your dentist. Your dentist will recommend other treatments if you show signs of gum disease, infections, or other problems.

Cleanings
A professional cleaning can get rid of any plaque you may have missed while brushing and flossing. It’ll also remove tartar. These cleanings are usually performed by a dental hygienist. After all the tartar is removed from your teeth, the hygienist will use a high-powered toothbrush to brush your teeth. This is followed by flossing and rinsing to wash out any debris.

A deep cleaning is also known as scaling and root planning. It removes tartar from above and below the gumline that can’t be reached during a routine cleaning.

Fluoride treatments
Following a dental cleaning, your dentist may apply a fluoride treatment to help fight off cavities. Fluoride is a naturally occurring mineral. It can help strengthen the enamel of your tooth and make them more resilient to bacteria and acid.

Antibiotics
If you show signs of a gum infection or you have a tooth abscess that has spread to other teeth or your jaw, your dentist may prescribe antibiotics to help get rid of the infection. The antibiotic may be in the form of a mouth rinse, gel, oral tablet, or capsule. Topical antibiotic gel may also be applied to the teeth or gums during surgical procedures.

Fillings, crowns, and sealants
A filling is used to repair a cavity, crack, or hole in the tooth. The dentist will first use a drill to remove the damaged area of the tooth and then fill the hole with some material, such as amalgam or composite.

A crown is used if a large portion of your tooth needs to be removed or has broken off due to an injury. There are two types of crowns: an implant crown that fits over an implant, and a regular crown that fits over a natural tooth. Both types of crowns fill in the gap where your natural tooth appeared.

Dental sealants are thin, protective coatings that are placed on the back teeth, or molars, to help prevent cavities. Your dentist may recommend a sealant for your children as soon as they get their first molars, at around age six, and again when they get their second set of molars around age 12. Sealants are easy to apply and completely painless.

Root canal
You might need a root canal if tooth decay reaches all the way inside the tooth to the nerve. During a root canal, the nerve is removed and replaced with a filling made of a biocompatible material, usually a combination of a rubber-like material called gutta-percha and adhesive cement.

Probiotics
Probiotics are mostly known for their role in digestive health, but new research has shown that the healthy bacteria may be beneficial for your teeth and gums.

Probiotics have been shown to prevent plaque and treat bad breath. They also help to prevent oral cancers and decrease inflammation from gum disease.

While large clinical trials are still needed to prove their effectiveness, results to date have been promising. You can take a probiotic supplement or eat foods high in beneficial bacteria, such as yogurt, kefir, and kimchi. Other popular probiotic foods include sauerkraut, tempeh, and miso.

Changing daily habits
Keeping your mouth healthy is a daily commitment. A dental hygienist can teach you how to properly take care of your teeth and gums on a daily basis. In addition to brushing and flossing, your daily routine can include mouthwash, oral rinses, and possibly other tools, such as a Waterpik water flosser.

 

Contact LIFETIME DENTAL GROUP IN CANTON OR SOUTH LYON, MICHIGAN TO SCHEDULE YOUR NEXT DENTAL CHECK-UP AND CLEANING

 

Dental Health and Your Overall Health

The condition of your mouth is closely tied to your overall health. Find out how oral health is linked to diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and more.

Taking care of your teeth isn’t just about having a nice smile and pleasant breath. Recent research has found a number of links between oral health and overall health. While in many cases, the nature of this link still isn’t clear — researchers have yet to conclude whether the connections are causal or correlative — what is certain is that the condition of your mouth is closely tied to your overall physical health.

Oral Health and Diabetes

Doctors have known for years that type 2 diabetics have an increased incidence of periodontitis or gum disease. In July 2008 the connection was further highlighted: Researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health followed 9,296 nondiabetic participants, measuring their level of periodontic bacteria over the course of 20 years. “We found that people who had higher levels of periodontal disease had a twofold risk of developing type 2 diabetes over that time period compared to people with low levels or no gum disease,” explains Ryan Demmer, PhD, associate researcher at the department of epidemiology at the Mailman School and the lead author. While more research is needed before doctors can conclude that gum disease actually leads to diabetes, there are already a few theories about why this might be the case: One proposes that when infections in your mouth get bad enough, they can lead to low-grade inflammation throughout your body, which in turn wreaks havoc on your sugar-processing abilities. “There are all kinds of inflammatory molecules,” says Dr. Demmer, “and it’s believed that maybe some attach to insulin receptors and prevent the body’s cells from using the insulin to get glucose into the cell.”

South Lyon Michigan Dentist - Dental Health and Your Overall Health

Oral Health and Heart Disease

As with diabetes, the connection between poor oral health and cardiovascular conditions has been recognized — the two are often found together — but it still hasn’t been determined conclusively whether or not there is a direct causal relationship between them. (One reason is that there are a number of other potential risk factors — such as smoking and old age — that can lead both to gum disease and heart disease.) However, in a 2005 study funded by the NIH, 1,056 randomly selected participants with no prior heart attacks or strokes were evaluated for levels of periodontal bacteria: After removing the effects of the other risk factors of age, gender, and smoking, it was found that there was an independent relationship between gum disease and heart disease, says Moise Desvarieux, MD, PhD, associate professor of epidemiology at the Mailman School and lead author of the study. One theory about why this may occur, says Dr. Desvarieux, is that small amounts of bacteria enter your bloodstream while you’re chewing. “Bad” bacteria from an infected mouth may lodge itself inside blood vessels, ultimately causing dangerous blockages. Strengthening his theory is the fact that when scientists have looked at atherosclerotic blood vessels, they have sometimes found fragments of periodontal bacteria. Meanwhile, a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2007 established that aggressive treatment of gum disease reduces the incidence of atherosclerosis within six months.

Pregnancy Complications and Gum Disease

For many pregnant women, gum infections stem from the fluctuating hormone levels that come with pregnancy, says Marsha Rubin, DDS, practicing diplomat of special-care dentistry at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell, who sees many pregnant patients in her practice. Others neglect their oral care during pregnancy since they have much on their minds, she adds. But that’s a mistake: Scientists believe that gum disease or inflammation in the mouth possibly triggers an increase in a chemical compound called prostaglandin, which induces early labor. While this theory has not yet been confirmed, a 2001 study found that pregnant women who develop gum disease between weeks 21 and 24 are four to seven times more likely to give birth before week 37. There is evidence that poor gum health in the extreme can lead to low birth weight as well. A number of studies — including a 2007 study of 3,567 Turkish women and a 2007 study of 1,305 Brazilian women — found a relationship between periodontal disease, preterm birth, and low birth weight.

Pneumonia and Gum Disease

There has been a link established between poor oral health and pneumonia, though much of the research focuses on high-risk populations. A 2008 study of elderly participants found that the number who developed pneumonia was 3.9 times higher in patients with periodontal infection than in those free from it. “The lungs are very close to the mouth,” says Rubin. “Even in a healthy mouth there is lots of bacteria, but bacteria in a not-healthy mouth can get aspirated into the lungs, causing pneumonia or aggravating COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.” Several intervention studies cited by the CDC show that an improvement in oral health can lead to a reduction in respiratory infection.

Pancreatic Cancer and Gum Disease

A study published in 2007 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute surveyed 51,529 American men about their health every two years between 1986 and 2002. Of the 216 participants who developed pancreatic cancer, 67 of them also had periodontal disease. Independent of the participants’ smoking status, the study found that having a history of periodontal disease was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. This, according to the study, could be because of systemic inflammation or increased levels of carcinogenic compounds produced in the infected mouth. Interestingly, another viable theory about why gum disease may cause type 2 diabetes points to damage to the pancreas as well. “With the pancreatic cancer study, we thought it was very interesting that you have this localized infection that has an impact on a systemic organ that is very intimately tied to the pathophysiology of diabetes,” says Dr. Desvarieux. Reasons for why this might be are as yet unknown.

Learn more in the Everyday Health Dental Health Center.

 

Vaping and Your Oral Health

As you’re no doubt aware, smoking is a dangerous habit that has serious health consequences. Although the dental effects of smoking pale in comparison to the life-threatening general health effects, they are nonetheless impactful and noteworthy. (Check out our slideshow on 7 dental health concerns for smokers.) Smoking stains the teeth and increases the risk of gum disease and oral cancer, potentially limits candidacy for certain popular treatments like dental implants, and more.

According to data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services one in five people smoke in the United States. Many of these smokers have transitioned away from traditional combustible cigarettes in recent years to the supposedly “safer” e-cigarette and vaping alternatives.

Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are relatively new products that convert a liquid concentrate into an aerosol via a heating element. Many of those trying to quit smoking end up using ENDS because there is no tobacco involved. (It is called “vaping” because ENDS vaporizes the nicotine for ingestion, without using any tobacco.) The idea that switching to ENDS is a stepping-stone to quitting entirely. However there are a number of people transitioning to ENDS because of the trend, and there are even new smokers using them as an entry point to starting smoking.

So it begs the question: Is vaping really less harmful to health (specifically oral health) than traditional smoking?

Unfortunately, this is a bit of a loaded question. Vaping is too new for there to be any long-term studies evaluating its health effects as compared with smoking. So it’s rather disingenuous to get into any sort of true comparison at this point. But we can look at the potential oral health effects of vaping as a standalone.

Nicotine and Oral Health

E-cigarettes may not contain tobacco, but they do contain nicotine, the highly addictive chemical additive in traditional cigarettes. A vasoconstrictor, nicotine inhibits blood flow which can have damaging effects throughout the body. The level of reduced blood flow in the mouth is particularly high, compared to other parts of the body, causing the vaporized nicotine to directly enter oral tissues as the vapor is inhaled. This reduced blood flow can lead to tissue death and gum recession. As if this isn’t bad enough (recession can increase your risk of a number of dental problems), the reduced blood flow can hide the symptoms of serious gum disease.

Gum inflammation and bleeding are two tell-tale signs of gum disease. By inhibiting blood flow and creating a reduced level of bleeding and inflammation, nicotine can make it more difficult for a dentist to identify gum disease. Considering that gum disease has been linked with stroke, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer risk, masking of its symptoms is a serious dental and general health concern.

Nicotine can also cause teeth grinding, which seriously damages the surfaces of the teeth and can impact bite alignment, leading to jaw-related problems like TMD.

Nicotine aside, there are other oral health concerns associated with vaping that still need to be studied. For example, the liquids used in vaping contain an array of chemicals (like diethylene glycol) that can potentially be harmful, depending on the concentrations and frequency of use. Many contain a menthol additive that has been shown to break down epithelial cells, potentially harming gum tissue. In addition, many dental patients who vape have reported issues related to dry mouth (xerostomia) which increases the risk of tooth decay.

The bottom line is simple. Although vaping might not share all the negative health effects of smoking combustible cigarettes, it has its own health concerns (specifically oral health concerns) that have not yet been fully studied or evaluated. If you use ENDS, speak with your dentist to learn more about the potential oral health effects.

 

Dental Check Ups in South Lyon Michigan

The Coronavirus Pandemic (COVID-19) has thrown off people’s regular six-month cleaning and check-up. Don’t think you can just skip your regular trip to the dentist though. We strongly recommend you don’t allow the pandemic to create bad oral hygiene habits for you — and that includes your biannual teeth cleanings. Lifetime Dental Group is conveniently located in South Lyon, MI and Canton, MI. Our team of dentists and dental hygienists are here to help keep your teeth clean and healthy during your regular biannual teeth cleanings and check-ups. Here are three reasons you need a dental cleaning every six months.

Stop Gum Disease Dead in Its Tracks

You’ve probably heard about gum disease, or at least its earliest stage, gingivitis, on toothpaste and mouthwash commercials. But did you know that, even though in some cases Belmont residents are genetically inclined to develop this disease, that visiting your dentist regularly is one of the best ways to detect gum disease, and get your mouth healthy again?

Our doctors at the Dental Restorative Group are able to detect early phases of gum disease in Belmont patients long before the telltale symptoms of red and swollen gums appear in our patients. By diagnosing gum disease early, we’re able to return your gums to a healthy state. And, if it’s been a while since you’ve last seen the dentist for a dental cleaning, we can diagnose additional stages of the disease, and put a proper treatment plan in place to restore your gums and save your teeth.

Prevent Plaque Build Up

Have you ever gone to your dentist only to hear that you have plaque build-up? Plaque is a sticky deposit that clings to your teeth and is full of all kinds of gross bacteria dental patients don’t want in their mouths. The buildup of plaque can also result in tartar, which discolors your teeth. While properly brushing your teeth twice a day, flossing once daily can prevent plaque build-up, it can’t kill or remove plaque or tartar once it’s present. Only a professional dental cleaning by a dental hygienist can do so, which is why you should see our doctors every six months.

Protect Yourself from Tooth Decay

Losing a tooth to tooth decay can be not only painful and embarrassing, as a missing tooth can negatively impact your smile, but also expensive to replace with a dental implant or other tooth replacement system. But it’s important to remember that tooth decay happens over time, not in an instant and that by coming to our doctors at Dental Restorative Group every six months for a dental cleaning, we can diagnose issues causing tooth decay and form a plan to save your affected tooth or teeth.

Call Us to Schedule a Dental Cleaning Today
Whether you’re always on time for your dental cleanings, or it’s been a while since you had one, our doctors are prepared to help you and your unique case. The best place for dental care in the South Lyon or Canton, Michigan area is the Lifetime Dental Group.

To schedule a routine dental cleaning today, call:

Canton, Michigan: (734) 844-1300
South Lyon, Michigan: (248) 437-1010

 

The Benefits of Probiotics for Your Oral Health

Probiotics can benefit our oral health as well as our digestive health. How are probiotics beneficial for our oral health?

While the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has not approved oral probiotics yet, we are seeing that research is beginning to suggest they may keep our mouths healthy. Below are a few potential health benefits of oral probiotics:

1. Preventing Plaque and Tooth Decay
A “bad” type of bacteria, Streptocuccus mutans, turns sugar into lactic acid, creating an acidic environment that can lead to the development of plaque and cavities. One study found that A12, a “good” type of bacteria, stops the growth of S. mutans and prevents plaque from forming. In addition, Bifidobacterium in the digestive system has been found to prevent tooth decay, as it reduces the amount of strep bacteria in the mouth.

2. Managing Gingivitis Symptoms
Gingivitis, or gum disease, produces such symptoms as sensitive teeth and swollen, sore gums. One study involved more than 50 gingivitis patients who took either a Lactobacillus reuteri probiotic supplement or a placebo. Two weeks later, the patients who took the highest dosage of probiotics displayed fewer symptoms and had less plaque than those who took the placebo.

3. Decreasing Gum Disease Inflammation
One study found that patients who took supplements containing the bacteria Lactobacillus brevis experienced a decrease in oral inflammation. Another study showed that a daily regimen of probiotic milk reduced inflammation in the mouth.

4. Preventing Halitosis
Commonly known as bad breath, halitosis can result from “bad” bacteria in the mouth or gut. A study involving more than 20 patients who took either a supplement containing the probiotic Streptococcus salivarius or a placebo, along with an antimicrobial mouthwash for three days, showed that 85 percent of those who took the probiotic supplement had less “bad” bacteria in their mouths than those who took the placebo.

South Lyon Michigan Dentist - Probiotics and Oral Health

Probiotic Sources
You can choose to take probiotics either as food or as supplements. Such enriched or fermented foods as soft cheeses, milk, sourdough bread, sauerkraut, dill pickles and yogurt are excellent sources of probiotics. Because they’re not so concentrated as supplements, these foods are better sources of probiotics for those at high risk of infection.You can find concentrated sources of probiotics in pill or in powder form. Your doctor or dietician may recommend that you take prebiotics along with probiotics. Prebiotics help healthy probiotics develop and grow.

Probiotic Side Effects
A healthy person shouldn’t experience any side effects from probiotics. However, if your risk of infection is high from an autoimmune disease, you shouldn’t take oral probiotic supplements. In addition, children, pregnant women and the elderly should talk to a doctor before taking probiotics. Even if you’re healthy, it’s wise to consult with your doctor before taking any kind of supplements, and you should never take more than the recommended dosage of probiotics.

Ask Your Dentist
We are just beginning to understand how our gut biome affects our health, especially oral health. While the initial results and data have been encouraging, we advise that you speak to an oral health expert, before making significant changes to your dental routine. Contact any of our dentists at South Lyon’s Lifetime Dental Group to determine your oral health needs with exams and specialized dental treatments.

 

National Toothbrush Day

Whether you’re in South Lyon or Canton or any other city near Lifetime Dental Group, today is a day of celebration! Break out your favorite flavor of toothpaste because today, June 26, is National Toothbrush Day! In honor of our favorite under-celebrated holiday, we’ve rounded up a few facts about the little brush that has a big impact on your oral health.

• Soft-bristled toothbrushes are best. Hard bristles can be painful when brushing and may eventually erode tooth enamel at the gum line.

• Rounded bristles are better than blunt-cut bristles, which may damage delicate gum tissue.

• Nylon bristles were not introduced until 1938. Before that, toothbrushes were made with boar-hair bristles!

• You should replace your toothbrush or electric toothbrush head every three months or when the bristles look frayed.

• Toothbrushes should be stored in an upright position to keep bacteria away.

• The first mass-produced toothbrush was made in 1780 by William Addis of Clerkenwald, England.

• Manual toothbrushes are just as effective as electric toothbrushes. The difference is that most people don’t spend enough time brushing with a manual toothbrush to get the job done properly.

• Although it’s recommended that people spend at least two minutes brushing twice a day, most people only brush for 46 seconds per session. Make sure you’re getting the full two minutes in by using a toothbrush timer or the timer on your phone.

 

Healthy Gums… Healthy YOU!

We've all heard of gum disease, but do you know that much about it? Gum disease can be really sinister and that's why dentists like us at Lifetime Dental Care in South Lyon and Canton are vigilant about it. You see, gum disease is caused by bacteria building up on and underneath your gums. Gum disease begins with barely noticeable symptoms to you (dentists are able to see it forming).

gingivitis_Bleeding_Gums_gum_disease_michigan

Here are some common symptoms of gingivitis, which is the first stage of gum disease:

* Red gums, not pink
* Swollen gums
* Tender gums
* Bleeding gums, particularly when you brush or floss
* Bad breath
* A little discomfort or tenderness when eating or drinking

You should know that most people tell us they didn’t worry when they saw a little blood on their toothbrush. However, after a while, it just becomes normal for them. But it’s anything but normal. It's vital that if you have any of these signs, you let us know. Early-stage gum disease is reversible with proper care. We can usually perform a dental cleaning and help you know how to take care of your gums at home.

For many people, gum disease may never move past gingivitis, which is inflammation of your gums. Yet, there’s no way to know how or when gingivitis will progress if you don’t see a professional dentist. If it does progress, you may be dealing with periodontitis, infection of your gums. This stage of gum disease is chronic and ranges from mild to advanced. You might notice some of the same symptoms as gingivitis, so you may not know your body is now fighting an infection. Here are some other symptoms associated with periodontitis:

* Receding gums
* Longer-looking teeth
* Notches on your teeth near your gums
* Pockets in your gums
* Pain in your gums
* Loose teeth
* Changes in your bite, with either your natural teeth or dentures

As your body fights the infection, it can start attacking your jawbone too. Of course, your bone supports your teeth, so with unhealthy gums and bones, you start to lose the vital support your teeth need. That’s why periodontal disease is responsible for more tooth loss than even cavities.

The dentists at Lifetime Dental in Canton, Michigan and South Lyon, Michigan think it’s best that you're on the look out for early signs of gum disease. It's our intention to always make sure you have healthy teeth and gums. Schedule your next dental cleaning with us today.

Canton, Michigan: (734) 844-1300
South Lyon, Michigan: (248) 437-1010

 

How Can Dentistry Enhance Your Overall health?

By Dr. Russell Thaler, Periodontist in South Lyon, Michigan

I hope everyone is safe and healthy during this global pandemic. Now, more than ever, it’s important to take care of your physical, emotional. and oral health. All of our lives have been impacted by this virus. The World Health Organization states that older people, and people with pre-existing medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease) appear to be more vulnerable to becoming severely ill with the virus.

Dr. Russell Thaler - Periodontist

How can Lifetime Dental in South Lyon, Michigan help?

At Lifetime Dental, many of our patients are surprised to learn that not only do we treat your oral health, but we are treating your overall health.

According to recent findings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), half of Americans aged 30 or older have periodontitis (gum disease), the more advanced form of periodontal disease. This equals approximately 64.7 million Americans.

Periodontal disease has been extensively linked with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, cancer, osteoporosis, and respiratory disease. As oral healthcare providers, we are also often the first to notice something in your mouth that could be associated with your overall health.

During our comprehensive exam, we will evaluate you for oral cancer, oral disease, cavities, and gum disease and establish a comprehensive treatment plan. Our treatment of any of these dental or gum issues will not only improve your oral health but will improve your overall general health too by reducing the inflammation and/or infection that harming your body.

Here at Lifetime Dental in South Lyon, Michigan, we care deeply about you and your health. We are here for you now and always.

 

4 Benefits of Teeth Whitening

 

By Dr. David Kam

The Benefits of Having a Brighter Smile

Your smile is one of the first things that people notice when they meet you. Straight, white teeth are no longer just for celebrities. Advancements in cosmetic dentistry over the last several years have made teeth whitening safer and more affordable for almost anyone wanting a brighter smile. But why is having a white smile important?

Dr David Kam - Dentist in Canton, Michigan

According to a national survey by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, 96% of adults believe an attractive smile makes a person more appealing to the opposite gender, and 74% of adults feel an unattractive smile can hurt a person's chances for career success. Having a clean, straight smile that you feel confident about enhances your social and career opportunities!

Types of Teeth Whitening

Teeth whitening has become a popular cosmetic treatment in many people’s lifestyles. Everywhere you look, from social media to magazines to posters in malls, whiter teeth are everywhere!

Perhaps you are on the fence about teeth whitening. Teeth whitening is a safe, life-enhancing process that can have a positive effect on both your physical appearance and psychological health. Here are 4 benefits of teeth whitening:

1. Teeth whitening boosts your self-confidence

With teeth whitening, your self-confidence will skyrocket. Whether you're at work, on a date, giving a presentation, or just walking down the street, a smile with bright, sparkly teeth is hard to miss! Whiter teeth are also an indication to others that you take care of yourself and care about your appearance. Those around you will be able to sense this!

Zoom Teeth Whitening Michigan

2. Teeth whitening enhances your appearance

You might have the healthiest teeth and straightest smile but you're not immune to the damage that everyone faces from everyday food and drink. Foods, coffee, tea, and soda stain our teeth over time. After the proper whitening procedure, you'll instantly notice the difference without having to 'filter' and/or edit your photos. Teeth whitening will help combat stains from your everyday food and drink. 

3. Teeth whitening minimizes the look of wrinkles

If you’re self-conscious about wrinkles, teeth whitening may be a great option for you! Instead of focusing on wrinkles, people are more likely to focus on your bright white smile. This will draw attention away from the appearance of surrounding wrinkles, acne scars, and frown lines.

4. Teeth whitening doesn’t break the bank

Teeth whitening doesn’t cost as much as plastic surgery! A touch-up kit after an in-office treatment will be enough to prolong the effect of your teeth whitening. The combination of teeth whitening plus an at-home enhancer is a small price tag that produces big results.

At Lifetime Dental Group, we’d love to help you get the whiter smile you’ve always wanted! If you’re interested in learning more about our teeth whitening options, simply request an appointment below and one of our team members will be in contact with you soon.

 

Coronavirus, Dentistry, and You!

By Dr. David Banooni, DDS

In the midst of this novel Coronavirus pandemic, making decisions regarding your oral and dental health can be challenging. Questions such as,

Is it safe to go to the dentist?” “When do I know if I’m having a dental emergency?” or “Can I come in for my cleaning?” Can leave us confused, in pain, and searching for answers.

 

Dr. David Banooni - General DentistHere are 4 answers to your oral health questions during Coronavirus

 

  1. When do I need to go and see the dentist?

            During a Pandemic, the best way to protect yourself and your family is to stay at home. However dental emergencies and pain may sometimes require us to pay a visit to our dental team. The best way to decide if you need to come into the office is to have a conversation with your dental team. At Lifetime Dental, our doctors are on call and available to conduct virtual consults with patients. During these calls, we help patients understand their dental concerns and often times we can resolve problems without requiring a visit to the office. Please call our office, speak with a doctor, and get your questions answered!

 

  1. How can I avoid a dental emergency?

            While some dental emergencies are unavoidable, the best way to reduce your risk is with preventative care! Brushing your teeth twice daily with fluoridated toothpaste, flossing, using an ADA approved oral rinse or mouthwash, and maintaining a lower sugar diet are still the best ways to stay healthy. Patients with a history of gum disease or those overdue for their cleanings should continue to follow these recommendations and monitor their dental team's social media page and website for updates. When it is safe, we at Lifetime Dental will resume our dental hygiene hours and get you and your smile back to full health!

 

  1. So is it safe to go to the dentist?

            Going to the dentist, or any healthcare professional can be a scary proposition for many during a pandemic. But your dental office should be taking additional steps to protect their patients and staff! At Lifetime Dental, we have taken steps above and beyond to ensure that all of our patients and staff are protected should you need to come to visit us. N95 masks, face shields, and gowns are all being used to protect our staff. Our offices have also invested in hospital-grade air purifiers for each room and specialized suction units to trap dental aerosols and kill the virus. Patient and staff safety continues to be our top priority.

 

  1. When will I be able to get my cleaning?

            In Michigan and many other states, governors have enacted orders to protect public health by limiting elective dental procedures such as cleanings. When it is safe to do so, we will resume our hygiene hours with the enhanced screening and operating protocols described above. In the meantime, continue to follow your doctor's recommended oral hygiene schedule by brushing and flossing! Check back on our social media pages and website for the latest information on when it is safe to return for your dental cleaning or call our office at any time!

As always, we cant wait to see you and your smiles

Stay Safe, Stay Healthy.

Dr. Banooni

 

Compassionate Dental Care in Canton, Michigan and South Lyon, Michigan


Lifetime Dental Group utilizes the latest in dental technology and compassionate chairside manner. Our Canton dentists and South Lyon dentists are dedicated to your continued oral health and wellness. Lifetime is Metro Detroit, Michigan's #1 family dentist practice!

canton dentists - canton michiganEvery smile is unique, which is why our team provides services to achieve our patient’s specific goals and needs. We take the time to get to know our patients and build a relationship so that we can provide our services on a foundation of trust. When you visit our practice, you will always see a familiar face welcoming you.

Whether you’re looking for a smile makeover using the latest in restorative and implant dentistry, or are seeking to sustain better overall oral health, we have the knowledge and experience within our specialized staff to meet your needs. We understand how difficult it can be to receive specialized care, as you may need to visit other practices to do so. Lifetime Dental houses a modern dental facility utilized by a team of specialists, dentists, hygienists, and staff to provide the care you need in the convenient locations of Canton and South Lyon.

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