Emergency Care Available!

Canton, Michigan: (734) 844-1300
South Lyon, Michigan: (248) 437-1010

Emergency Care Available!


Canton, Michigan: (734) 844-1300


South Lyon, Michigan: (248) 437-1010

Dental Health and Your Overall Health

Posts Tagged ‘Teeth’

 

Dental Health and Your Overall Health

Posted on: September 21st, 2020 by admin

The condition of your mouth is closely tied to your overall health. Find out how oral health is linked to diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and more.

Taking care of your teeth isn’t just about having a nice smile and pleasant breath. Recent research has found a number of links between oral health and overall health. While in many cases, the nature of this link still isn’t clear — researchers have yet to conclude whether the connections are causal or correlative — what is certain is that the condition of your mouth is closely tied to your overall physical health.

Oral Health and Diabetes

Doctors have known for years that type 2 diabetics have an increased incidence of periodontitis or gum disease. In July 2008 the connection was further highlighted: Researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health followed 9,296 nondiabetic participants, measuring their level of periodontic bacteria over the course of 20 years. “We found that people who had higher levels of periodontal disease had a twofold risk of developing type 2 diabetes over that time period compared to people with low levels or no gum disease,” explains Ryan Demmer, PhD, associate researcher at the department of epidemiology at the Mailman School and the lead author. While more research is needed before doctors can conclude that gum disease actually leads to diabetes, there are already a few theories about why this might be the case: One proposes that when infections in your mouth get bad enough, they can lead to low-grade inflammation throughout your body, which in turn wreaks havoc on your sugar-processing abilities. “There are all kinds of inflammatory molecules,” says Dr. Demmer, “and it’s believed that maybe some attach to insulin receptors and prevent the body’s cells from using the insulin to get glucose into the cell.”

South Lyon Michigan Dentist - Dental Health and Your Overall Health

Oral Health and Heart Disease

As with diabetes, the connection between poor oral health and cardiovascular conditions has been recognized — the two are often found together — but it still hasn’t been determined conclusively whether or not there is a direct causal relationship between them. (One reason is that there are a number of other potential risk factors — such as smoking and old age — that can lead both to gum disease and heart disease.) However, in a 2005 study funded by the NIH, 1,056 randomly selected participants with no prior heart attacks or strokes were evaluated for levels of periodontal bacteria: After removing the effects of the other risk factors of age, gender, and smoking, it was found that there was an independent relationship between gum disease and heart disease, says Moise Desvarieux, MD, PhD, associate professor of epidemiology at the Mailman School and lead author of the study. One theory about why this may occur, says Dr. Desvarieux, is that small amounts of bacteria enter your bloodstream while you’re chewing. “Bad” bacteria from an infected mouth may lodge itself inside blood vessels, ultimately causing dangerous blockages. Strengthening his theory is the fact that when scientists have looked at atherosclerotic blood vessels, they have sometimes found fragments of periodontal bacteria. Meanwhile, a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2007 established that aggressive treatment of gum disease reduces the incidence of atherosclerosis within six months.

Pregnancy Complications and Gum Disease

For many pregnant women, gum infections stem from the fluctuating hormone levels that come with pregnancy, says Marsha Rubin, DDS, practicing diplomat of special-care dentistry at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell, who sees many pregnant patients in her practice. Others neglect their oral care during pregnancy since they have much on their minds, she adds. But that’s a mistake: Scientists believe that gum disease or inflammation in the mouth possibly triggers an increase in a chemical compound called prostaglandin, which induces early labor. While this theory has not yet been confirmed, a 2001 study found that pregnant women who develop gum disease between weeks 21 and 24 are four to seven times more likely to give birth before week 37. There is evidence that poor gum health in the extreme can lead to low birth weight as well. A number of studies — including a 2007 study of 3,567 Turkish women and a 2007 study of 1,305 Brazilian women — found a relationship between periodontal disease, preterm birth, and low birth weight.

Pneumonia and Gum Disease

There has been a link established between poor oral health and pneumonia, though much of the research focuses on high-risk populations. A 2008 study of elderly participants found that the number who developed pneumonia was 3.9 times higher in patients with periodontal infection than in those free from it. “The lungs are very close to the mouth,” says Rubin. “Even in a healthy mouth there is lots of bacteria, but bacteria in a not-healthy mouth can get aspirated into the lungs, causing pneumonia or aggravating COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.” Several intervention studies cited by the CDC show that an improvement in oral health can lead to a reduction in respiratory infection.

Pancreatic Cancer and Gum Disease

A study published in 2007 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute surveyed 51,529 American men about their health every two years between 1986 and 2002. Of the 216 participants who developed pancreatic cancer, 67 of them also had periodontal disease. Independent of the participants’ smoking status, the study found that having a history of periodontal disease was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. This, according to the study, could be because of systemic inflammation or increased levels of carcinogenic compounds produced in the infected mouth. Interestingly, another viable theory about why gum disease may cause type 2 diabetes points to damage to the pancreas as well. “With the pancreatic cancer study, we thought it was very interesting that you have this localized infection that has an impact on a systemic organ that is very intimately tied to the pathophysiology of diabetes,” says Dr. Desvarieux. Reasons for why this might be are as yet unknown.

Learn more in the Everyday Health Dental Health Center.

National Toothbrush Day

Posted on: June 26th, 2020 by admin

Whether you’re in South Lyon or Canton or any other city near Lifetime Dental Group, today is a day of celebration! Break out your favorite flavor of toothpaste because today, June 26, is National Toothbrush Day! In honor of our favorite under-celebrated holiday, we’ve rounded up a few facts about the little brush that has a big impact on your oral health.

• Soft-bristled toothbrushes are best. Hard bristles can be painful when brushing and may eventually erode tooth enamel at the gum line.

• Rounded bristles are better than blunt-cut bristles, which may damage delicate gum tissue.

• Nylon bristles were not introduced until 1938. Before that, toothbrushes were made with boar-hair bristles!

• You should replace your toothbrush or electric toothbrush head every three months or when the bristles look frayed.

• Toothbrushes should be stored in an upright position to keep bacteria away.

• The first mass-produced toothbrush was made in 1780 by William Addis of Clerkenwald, England.

• Manual toothbrushes are just as effective as electric toothbrushes. The difference is that most people don’t spend enough time brushing with a manual toothbrush to get the job done properly.

• Although it’s recommended that people spend at least two minutes brushing twice a day, most people only brush for 46 seconds per session. Make sure you’re getting the full two minutes in by using a toothbrush timer or the timer on your phone.

Healthy Gums… Healthy YOU!

Posted on: May 27th, 2020 by admin

We've all heard of gum disease, but do you know that much about it? Gum disease can be really sinister and that's why dentists like us at Lifetime Dental Care in South Lyon and Canton are vigilant about it. You see, gum disease is caused by bacteria building up on and underneath your gums. Gum disease begins with barely noticeable symptoms to you (dentists are able to see it forming).

gingivitis_Bleeding_Gums_gum_disease_michigan

Here are some common symptoms of gingivitis, which is the first stage of gum disease:

* Red gums, not pink
* Swollen gums
* Tender gums
* Bleeding gums, particularly when you brush or floss
* Bad breath
* A little discomfort or tenderness when eating or drinking

You should know that most people tell us they didn’t worry when they saw a little blood on their toothbrush. However, after a while, it just becomes normal for them. But it’s anything but normal. It's vital that if you have any of these signs, you let us know. Early-stage gum disease is reversible with proper care. We can usually perform a dental cleaning and help you know how to take care of your gums at home.

For many people, gum disease may never move past gingivitis, which is inflammation of your gums. Yet, there’s no way to know how or when gingivitis will progress if you don’t see a professional dentist. If it does progress, you may be dealing with periodontitis, infection of your gums. This stage of gum disease is chronic and ranges from mild to advanced. You might notice some of the same symptoms as gingivitis, so you may not know your body is now fighting an infection. Here are some other symptoms associated with periodontitis:

* Receding gums
* Longer-looking teeth
* Notches on your teeth near your gums
* Pockets in your gums
* Pain in your gums
* Loose teeth
* Changes in your bite, with either your natural teeth or dentures

As your body fights the infection, it can start attacking your jawbone too. Of course, your bone supports your teeth, so with unhealthy gums and bones, you start to lose the vital support your teeth need. That’s why periodontal disease is responsible for more tooth loss than even cavities.

The dentists at Lifetime Dental in Canton, Michigan and South Lyon, Michigan think it’s best that you're on the look out for early signs of gum disease. It's our intention to always make sure you have healthy teeth and gums. Schedule your next dental cleaning with us today.

Canton, Michigan: (734) 844-1300
South Lyon, Michigan: (248) 437-1010

How Can Dentistry Enhance Your Overall health?

Posted on: May 18th, 2020 by admin

By Dr. Russell Thaler, Periodontist in South Lyon, Michigan

I hope everyone is safe and healthy during this global pandemic. Now, more than ever, it’s important to take care of your physical, emotional. and oral health. All of our lives have been impacted by this virus. The World Health Organization states that older people, and people with pre-existing medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease) appear to be more vulnerable to becoming severely ill with the virus.

Dr. Russell Thaler - Periodontist

How can Lifetime Dental in South Lyon, Michigan help?

At Lifetime Dental, many of our patients are surprised to learn that not only do we treat your oral health, but we are treating your overall health.

According to recent findings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), half of Americans aged 30 or older have periodontitis (gum disease), the more advanced form of periodontal disease. This equals approximately 64.7 million Americans.

Periodontal disease has been extensively linked with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, cancer, osteoporosis, and respiratory disease. As oral healthcare providers, we are also often the first to notice something in your mouth that could be associated with your overall health.

During our comprehensive exam, we will evaluate you for oral cancer, oral disease, cavities, and gum disease and establish a comprehensive treatment plan. Our treatment of any of these dental or gum issues will not only improve your oral health but will improve your overall general health too by reducing the inflammation and/or infection that harming your body.

Here at Lifetime Dental in South Lyon, Michigan, we care deeply about you and your health. We are here for you now and always.

Strategies for How to Make Brushing Teeth Fun

Posted on: April 27th, 2020 by admin

Lifetime Dental Group in Canton and South Lyon, Michigan wants to make teeth brushing teeth fun for your family! Our dental team led by Dr. David Kam has put together a few ideas to get you started:

Find Fun Dental Health Education Resources.

At Lifetime Dental, we believe that family dental care starts with an educational but fun approach. Try reading age-appropriate books and watching videos about dental hygiene with your child as you begin exploring how to make brushing teeth fun. Your child will enjoy the time you spend together learning about oral health, and you’ll enjoy the opportunity to introduce healthy habits like brushing and flossing.

 

Brushing Teeth - Michigan Dentists

Make Brushing and Flossing a Family Affair.

Setting an example for your kids is one of your most powerful tools to make brushing teeth fun. To model good dental hygiene, brush, and floss at least twice daily with your children, including once before bedtime. For younger children, you might even have them practice brushing your teeth! The routine of family brushing will establish consistency, so children will be able to learn healthy habits more easily. Plus, extra family time and attention for your child is never a bad thing! Sometimes, it takes teamwork to accomplish family goals, and proper dental care is worth the extra effort!

Create a Two-minute “Contest” For Brushing.

In addition to “how to make brushing teeth fun,” our Lifetime Dental Team of dentists and hygienists frequently answers questions like “how long children should brush their teeth.” Adults and children alike should brush teeth for two minutes twice daily, including before bedtime. To make brushing teeth fun, make a game of it, and set the timer for two minutes; the “winner” must brush for the entire two minutes without stopping. This type of game will create a sense of friendly competition and motivate your kids to brush properly.

Get Your Child a Special Toothbrush

As adults, we forget the novelty of incorporating toys into everyday life. Relive the magic of childhood and indulge your child in a special toothbrush of his or her choosing. You’ll find that, by adapting the toothbrushing process into a game with “toys” of sorts, you’ve found one special way to make brushing teeth fun.

Reward Consistent Tooth Brushing.

To really make twice-daily brushing and flossing something that really catches kids’ attention, reward their behavior. Start small by choosing a simple reward (like gold stars), and award it only when kids brush and floss as instructed (i.e. two minutes per day twice a day for brushing and once a day for flossing). Once kids have the mechanics and schedule of brushing in place, reward consistency by creating a weekly brushing calendar; each week of perfect daily brushing results in a bigger reward.

Recruit the Tooth Fairy.

Not everyone realizes that the tooth fairy pays more for teeth that are clean and cavity-free. Make sure your child knows this fact; it will go a long way in motivating your child to engage in daily brushing and flossing!

Compassionate Dental Care in Canton, Michigan and South Lyon, Michigan


Lifetime Dental Group utilizes the latest in dental technology and compassionate chairside manner. Our Canton dentists and South Lyon dentists are dedicated to your continued oral health and wellness. Lifetime is Metro Detroit, Michigan's #1 family dentist practice!

canton dentists - canton michiganEvery smile is unique, which is why our team provides services to achieve our patient’s specific goals and needs. We take the time to get to know our patients and build a relationship so that we can provide our services on a foundation of trust. When you visit our practice, you will always see a familiar face welcoming you.

Whether you’re looking for a smile makeover using the latest in restorative and implant dentistry, or are seeking to sustain better overall oral health, we have the knowledge and experience within our specialized staff to meet your needs. We understand how difficult it can be to receive specialized care, as you may need to visit other practices to do so. Lifetime Dental houses a modern dental facility utilized by a team of specialists, dentists, hygienists, and staff to provide the care you need in the convenient locations of Canton and South Lyon.

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